Pharma Lows and Tech Highs in Irish Manufacturing

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It was recently discovered that a GlaxoSmithKline pharmaceutical plant located in Ireland, held contaminated drug ingredients that possibly affected supplies of weight-loss drugs shipped to the United States and Puerto Rico.

The supplies have since been recalled; however, according to Reuters, officials believe the plant didn’t act fast enough for proper safety precautions.

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The report by Reuters notes, “Ranbaxy Laboratories Ltd has been banned from exporting drugs from its Indian plants to the United States. One of Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd’s plants and some of Wockhardt Ltd’s plants have also been barred from exporting to the United States.”

According to Bloomberg, “Ranbaxy has more than 14,600 employees, and 21 manufacturing facilities in 8 countries, including in India, Ireland, Romania and the U.S.”

There is no word yet on whether the recent contamination will prevent the exportation of drugs from this and other Irish pharmaceutical plants.

As Ireland swallows the bitter pill that is its pharmaceutical sector, companies and their workers may find a remedy in medical tech manufacturing. From exports to imports, Ireland’s latest transplant company reveals more about the growing economy.

Biz Journals reports, “The Irish government will commit about $16.6 million in funding to help the program, RTE-Ireland reports, as well as industry experts to help develop technology launched out of Mayo. Mayo is sending development work to Ireland because getting research products ready for market in the United States has become more expensive.”

The deal will associate the manufacture of advanced medical equipment and medical studies to Ireland. Economists believe the move by Mayo will increase Irish manufacturing, as well as jobs within the sector.

The Irish Times states, “This [move] will involve further development and validation of the technologies by research teams in Irish Higher Education Institutes, as well as introductions to investors to bring the technologies to markets.” [/show_to]

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