Tech Companies Work to Flat Line Future Heartbleeds

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Tech companies are vulnerable. They’re a part of an industry that’s already tasked with remaining competitive in an ever-changing market. Not only do they face the pressure to fulfil orders while ensuring supplier costs are low, they also experience external threats as well.

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Enter: Heartbleed, the Internet bug that recently rocked the tech world when it was first discovered in early April 2014. Read on to learn more on how tech companies are working together to fight back against future vulnerabilities.

How Bugs Affect All Companies

These days, almost every company is a tech company. That is to say, almost every business has a website and many manage their sales solely through an online portal. The security of these websites is just as important as the security of the tech devices that access them.

Even if an establishment isn’t a tech company per se, the business’ daily operations are likely still executed by computerized tools, and these tools are often defenseless to unforeseen bugs.

Data stored is data hacked, it’s all in a day’s work for the Heartbleed bug. According to Information Week, that’s exactly the problem, “the larger issue is that most companies haven’t properly catalogued the technology they’re using to manage traffic to both in-house applications and purchased software.”

Unsecured and unchecked software is bound to affect manufacturers whether it starts in their warehouses or through the portals of their online stores. Many companies fail to properly evaluate their technology, and hackers take advantage of their inattention.

Security Threats in the Midst of Manufacturing

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From online marketplaces such as eBay to tech manufacturers such as Cisco (routers), Internet bugs pervade all aspects of manufacturing and distribution. If consumers don’t feel safe buying online, online stores suffer and over manufacturing results in net loss. If access points, such as routers, can’t defend from hackers then the tech companies must re-manufacture their devices.

Techies understand the potential losses associated with security threats like Heartbleed; therefore, it’s inevitable that computer giants would band together to solve the problem for not only the innovators, but for businesses overall.

Funds for Future Heartbleeds

Image via Flickr by Electronic_Frontier_Foundation

Microsoft, along with Google and Facebook, has started a fund for research regarding other prospective threats. The funds will be used specifically for research on OpenSSL, the website feature that helps prevent hackers from accessing secure website information. It’s a standard protocol used by millions of websites, and its vulnerabilities are exactly what future bugs like Heartbleed will continue to target.

Whether the funds will actually deter hackers remains to be seen — but, as for those affected manufacturers, suppliers, distributors, and consumers, at least it’s a start.

There will always be anonymous users and automated programs that prey on the Internet’s and manufacturers’ weaknesses. Exploring intelligent design is the first step in keeping tech assembly lines running smoothly – no matter what aspect of the company is affected.

What more could tech companies do to flat line potential Heartbleed bugs? Was your business impacted by Heartbleed? We want to hear from you. Share your thoughts and stories in the comments below. [/show_to]

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